How to write a rough draft for a research paper

From there, the writer builds toward a thesis, which is traditionally placed at the end of the introduction. Think of your thesis as a signpost that lets readers know in what direction the paper is headed.

How to write a rough draft for a research paper

This is the phase of writing where you will sink the most time and effort into your work. That first, rough draft is immensely important in shaping how your paper will ultimately turn out. You can see how your ideas work together on the page, find spots that you need to beef up with more research, and discover where tweaks and restructuring might need to happen before you turn in the final iteration of your work.

Anything and everything can be changed, and this is the best time to make serious structural changes regarding your paper.

Seeking perfection on the rough draft will lead to nothing but stress and frustration, both of which may hamper your ability to complete an effective draft.

While you write, keep these tips in mind.

How to write a rough draft for a research paper

For instance, you surely have bits of research that are more essential to include in your body paragraphs than others. The inessential pieces of your research are more appropriately added in future drafts. The rough draft is the best time to double check that your paper and the arguments, points, or clarifications made within it all follow sensible logic.

Ideas must be given breathing room and allowed to develop naturally as the essay goes on. Let things naturally build as you write. Instead, take your time with your work, and make sure that there is logical development with the topics brought up in your work.

Follow the idea until it reaches a logical conclusion. If necessary, you can cut out the extraneous portions of your tangent from future drafts. Additionally, the rough draft is an excellent time to work on establishing smooth transitions between your paragraphs.

As a writer, avoiding jarring or choppy segues between the different ideas you bring up is deceptively difficult, but taking the time to really make sure that your work flows effectively from paragraph to paragraph will reflect well on you and your writing ability.

Having strong transitions also helps ensure that those who read your work - whether it is a professor or one of your peers - will have less trouble understanding your thought process. Clarity is the name of the game here, and a surefire way to achieve that clarity is by making sure your transitions are straightforward.

Furthermore, your writing should be clear and uncomplicated. A big part of this is always using the active voice while you write. This simply means to establish that, within your sentences, the subject is performing the action, as opposed to the action happening to the subject as a result of the object.

An easy way to detect usage of the passive voice is to look for words denoting the past tense, such as were or was. For example, "The rations were served to the refugees by aid workers. Your thesis will be central to the construction of your introduction, as it must be presented here for the first time.

Body Paragraphs In any rough draft, the body paragraphs should be where you focus the brunt of your energy. While you can rearrange the sections of your paper as you need to later on, the rough draft is an excellent time to simply dump your information into the appropriate body paragraph, then provide your own analysis.

This strategy will help you give the paper some semblance of what it will ultimately look like by the time you have finished the revision process. It will save time when it comes to polishing the paper during the review process. While it may be tempting to avoid being expansive with your words during the rough draft and write short paragraphs instead, avoid falling into this trap.

The rough draft deserves your full attention, and that means developing your notions in this round of writing. There is no place for underdeveloped ideas in the rough draft. Conclusion The conclusion of your rough draft should serve a couple of different purposes. Most importantly, the conclusion needs to effectively summarize the ideas you discussed throughout your entire essay.

Restate your thesis and show how the ideas you brought up in your body paragraphs directly relate to and answer the questions it raised in your introduction.

With a strong rough draft, the revision process becomes a snap. The rough draft is for you, the writer.Sure you can write a rough draft in one night, but remember that what you're writing is a rough draft. Make sure spend a lot of time revising the assignment.

The Structure of a Research Paper

Make sure spend a . The rough draft is intended to be the first attempt at writing the research paper which contains most of the information and ideas intended to be presented in the final paper, without bothering too much about the the details like style of writing, clarity of expression, uniformity in presentation, grammar, spellings, physical appearance, and other similar details.

Research Paper: Write a First Draft.

Every essay or paper is made up of three parts: introduction body conclusion; The introduction is the first paragraph of the paper. The rough draft is the best time to double check that your paper and the arguments, points, or clarifications made within it all follow sensible logic.

Ideas must be given breathing room and allowed to develop naturally as the essay goes on. Research Papers. Establish your topic. Look for sources of information.

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Read your sources and take notes. Organize your ideas.

How to write a rough draft for a research paper

Write a first draft. Use footnotes or endnotes to document sources. Write a bibliography. Revise the first draft.

Proofread the final draft. At last, you are ready to begin writing the rough draft of your research paper. Putting your thinking and research into words is exciting. It can also be challenging.

Creating a Rough Draft for a Research Paper | Writing for Success