Dewey s reflective thinking method

Varied Senses of the Term Four senses of thought, from the wider to the limited No words are oftener on our lips than thinking and thought. So profuse and varied, indeed, is our use of these words that it is not easy to define just what we mean by them.

Dewey s reflective thinking method

Several themes recur throughout these writings. Dewey continually argues that education and learning are social and interactive processes, and thus the school itself is a social institution through which social reform can and should take place.

In addition, he believed that students thrive in an environment where they are allowed to experience and interact with the curriculum, and all students should have the opportunity to take part in their own learning. Dewey makes a strong case for the importance of education not only as a place to gain content knowledge, but also as a place to learn how to live.

He notes that "to prepare him for the future life means to give him command of himself; it means so to train him that he will have the full and ready use of all his capacities" My Pedagogic Creed, Dewey, In addition to helping Dewey s reflective thinking method realize their full potential, Dewey goes on to acknowledge that education and schooling are instrumental in creating social change and reform.

He notes that "education is a regulation of the process of coming to share in the social consciousness; and that the adjustment of individual activity on the basis of this social consciousness is the only sure method of social reconstruction".

In addition to his ideas regarding what education is and what effect it should have on society, Dewey also had specific notions regarding how education should take place within the classroom.

In The Child and the CurriculumDewey discusses two major conflicting schools of thought regarding educational pedagogy. The first is centered on the curriculum and focuses almost solely on the subject matter to be taught. Dewey argues that the major flaw in this methodology is the inactivity of the student; within this particular framework, "the child is simply the immature being who is to be matured; he is the superficial being who is to be deepened"p.

At the same time, Dewey was alarmed by many of the "child-centered" excesses of educational-school pedagogues who claimed to be his followers, and he argued that too much reliance on the child could be equally detrimental to the learning process.

In this second school of thought, "we must take our stand with the child and our departure from him. It is he and not the subject-matter which determines both quality and quantity of learning" Dewey,pp.

According to Dewey, the potential flaw in this line of thinking is that it minimizes the importance of the content as well as the role of the teacher. In order to rectify this dilemma, Dewey advocated for an educational structure that strikes a balance between delivering knowledge while also taking into account the interests and experiences of the student.

He notes that "the child and the curriculum are simply two limits which define a single process. Just as two points define a straight line, so the present standpoint of the child and the facts and truths of studies define instruction" Dewey,p.

It is through this reasoning that Dewey became one of the most famous proponents of hands-on learning or experiential educationwhich is related to, but not synonymous with experiential learning. The works of John Dewey provide the most prolific examples of how this limited vocational view of education has been applied to both the K—12 public education system and to the teacher training schools who attempted to quickly produce proficient and practical teachers with a limited set of instructional and discipline-specific skills needed to meet the needs of the employer and demands of the workforce.

In The School and Society Dewey, and Democracy of Education Dewey,Dewey claims that rather than preparing citizens for ethical participation in society, schools cultivate passive pupils via insistence upon mastery of facts and disciplining of bodies.

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Rather than preparing students to be reflective, autonomous and ethical beings capable of arriving at social truths through critical and intersubjective discourse, schools prepare students for docile compliance with authoritarian work and political structures, discourage the pursuit of individual and communal inquiry, and perceive higher learning as a monopoly of the institution of education Dewey, ; For Dewey and his philosophical followers, education stifles individual autonomy when learners are taught that knowledge is transmitted in one direction, from the expert to the learner.

Dewey not only re-imagined the way that the learning process should take place, but also the role that the teacher should play within that process. As Dewey notes, this limited vocational view is also applied to teacher training schools who attempt to quickly produce proficient and practical teachers with a limited set of instructional and discipline skills needed to meet the needs of the employer and demands of the workforce Dewey, For Dewey, the school and the classroom teacher, as a workforce and provider of a social service, have a unique responsibility to produce psychological and social goods that will lead to both present and future social progress.Experience and Reflective Thinking.

The starting place in Dewey's philosophy and educational theory is the world of everyday life. Unlike many philosophers, Dewey did not search beyond the realm of ordinary experience to find some more fundamental and enduring reality.

I believe that education is the fundamental method of social . John Dewey's Reflective Thinking process Who was John Dewey, and what did he believe?

Dewey s reflective thinking method

In order to do this, students,with the guidance of their teacher, should come . John Dewey (/ ˈ d uː i /; October 20, – June 1, ) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer whose ideas have been influential in education and social reform.

Dewey is one of the primary figures associated with the philosophy of pragmatism and is considered one of the fathers of functional psychology.A Review of . Just as importantly, Dewey argues, reflective thought acts as an antidote to autopilot — it “affords the sole method of escape from purely impulsive or purely routine action.” But like the use of any tool, thinking “may go wrong as well as right, and hence needs safeguarding and training.”.

Reflective thinking is always more or less troublesome because it involves overcoming the inertia that inclines one to accept suggestions at their face value; it involves willingness to endure a condition of mental unrest and disturbance.

Speech Class Group Project. Search this site. Home. Project Assignment. Dewey's Reflective Thinking Method. Prepare & Deliver Presentation. Group Presentation Evaluation. Peer Evaluation. Steps of the Reflective Thinking Method. Define the Problem. Analyze the Problem. Establish Solution Criteria. reflective thinking John Dewey's problem-solving method, which includes defining a problem, analyzing it, suggesting possible solutions for it, selecting the best solution for it, and testing and implementing that solution. Dewey’s Policy Question/Reflective Thinking Method Worksheet Group Member’s: Ashely, Anthony, Hannah, Jasmine, Lavondria, Isna Topic: What should the government do to eliminate the problem associated with collection, and expedition of DNA evidence used to exonerate wrongfully convicted inmates?

Start studying Chapter 13 - Five Steps of Reflective Thinking. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

Dewey s reflective thinking method
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